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Free Negro Education newspaper clippings

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0389
The collection consists of 100 orignal newspaper clippings removed from newspapers, 1848-1905, largely dealing with public policy for the education of African-Americans after the period of Reconstruction. The bulk of the clippings discuss efforts to educate a population recently freed from slavery.

Dates

  • 1848-1905

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.76 Cubic Feet (2 letter size document boxes)

Historical Note

Historian Rayford Logan of Howard University, described the years, 1877-1900, following the period of Reconstruction as "the nadir in Negro life and history." Many of the modest gains of black Americans following the Civil War were nullified. The national government during the administrations of Rutherford B. Hayes through William McKinley adopted a "hands off" policy toward the "Southern problem." Little assistance came from state and local authorities, and black citizens confronted legalized segregation, discrimination, and political disfranchisement. The postwar period's greatest failure was in the realm of economics. Black leaders advocated land redistribution and education in order that freedmen might acquire financial independence and mobility. In 1900, 90 percent of black Americans still lived in the South where economic realities were grim and the quality of education was poor. Segregation and discrimination were not exclusive to the South but flourished as well in northern cities where civil rights laws went unenforced and racial violence ignited. At the turn of the 19th century, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois articulated the injustices faced by black citizens and the urgency for social change.

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of 100 orignal newspaper clippings removed from newspapers, 1848-1905, largely dealing with public policy for the education of African-Americans after the period of Reconstruction. The clippings are mostly from newspapers in the Northeast including The New York Times, The New York Daily Tribune, The Buffalo Express, the Buffalo Courier, The Boston Post, The Baltimore Sun, and The Providence Journal. Other clippings are from papers in Memphis, Atlanta, Nashville, and Missouri. The bulk of the clippings discuss efforts to educate a population recently freed from slavery.

As a whole, the collection is an overview of societal attitudes and opinions related to questions of race and integration following the aftermath of the American Civil War. Headings of the clippings include: "The Education of the Freedmen" (12/10/1884); "Color in School" (8/22/1887); "The Future of the Negro" (1/28/1889); "Can the Race Problem be Solved?" (12/1889); and "Southern Whites Must Solve the Race Problem" (10/25/1905).

Custodial History

The original newspaper clippings that form this collection were formerly bound with the title, Free Negro Education Newspaper Clippings (E441 .A2 F8 V. 14). The previous thirteen volumes in this series were cataloged as separate items in the Birney Anti-Slavery Collection.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

There is no known acquisition information for this collection.

Related Materials

The clippings have been photocopied and bound as a single volume. The volume is cataloged for Special Collections (Cage LC2801 .F74 1882).

Bibliography

The Black Man in America since Reconstruction. ed. by David M. Reimers. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1971. Hornsby, Alton. Chronology of African-American History: Significant Events and People from 1619 to the Present. Detroit: Gale Research, 1991.

Processing Information

Finding aid prepared by Joan Grattan in November 1997.

The clippings are attached to pages and were formerly bound, cataloged, and titled Free Negro Education Newspaper Clippings (E441 .A2 F8 V. 14). The clippings were removed from binding to form a manuscript collection and arranged chronologically in two document boxes. (Other pamphlets in this series formed the Birney Anti-Slavery Collection, later cataloged separately and available in Special Collections.) The clippings have also been photocopied and bound into a single volume with the same title: Free Negro Education Newspaper Clippings (Cage LC 2801. F74 1882). The newspaper clippings in the bound volume are not arranged chronologically.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA