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Hidden Treasure, commonplace book of a Maryland society of men

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0867
This collection conists of one commonplace book of poems and essays, titled Hidden Treasure, kept jointly by a society of men in 1833-1834, likely in Baltimore, Maryland. The contents of the book suggest ties to the Methodist Church, and one contributer, David Creamer, was likely the Baltimore hymnographer of same name (1812–1887) who wrote Methodist Hymnology (1849).

Dates

  • 1833 - 1834

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Contact Special Collections for more information.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

1 Items (1 commonplace book)

Biographical / Historical

Derived from dealer description: No historical information is available about the society to which this book belonged at this time. One contributer, David Creamer (1812-1887), was a Baltimorean hymnographer who published the book Methodist Hymnology in 1849.

Content Description

Derived from dealer description: This collection consists of one leatherbound gilt-edged commonplace book of original essays and poems, titled Hidden Treasure, kept jointly by a society of men, likely in Baltimore, Maryland. Dates of composition range from 1833 to 1834. The essays and poems often focus on religious topics, sentimental thoughts, and death, such as “Christian Fortitude,” “A Night at Camp Meeting,” “Ode to the Bible Class,” “Conversion,” “Reflections in a Grave Yard,” “Remarks on Pride,” and “A Mother’s Smile.” Some of the essays suggest their common bond with the Methodist Church, such as two entries by David Creamer, likely the Baltimore hymnographer of same name (1812–1887) and author of Methodist Hymnology (1849). In addition, there are two essays of a more political or economic valence, including one Luddite essay against new manufacturing technologies and one essay about the public policy of the bank of the United States. There are twenty-one contributors in all, over half of whom penned more than one entry. Some entries include pressed flowers and plant leaves.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Ian Brabner in February 2019

Processing Information

Processed by Austyn Wohlers in September 2019.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA