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Johns Hopkins University. Department of Mechanical Engineering

 Corporate Entity

Dates

  • Existence: 1985-
  • Existence: approximately 1919-1960

Officially known as the Department of Mechanical Engineering twice in this department's history from approximately 1919 to 1960, and from 1985 to present, this field of study was one of the three engineering concentrations first offered at Johns Hopkins University starting in 1913. Since then, the department’s contributions to engineering education and research at the university have been ground-breaking.

A major reorganization and combining of the Departments of Aeronautics, Civil Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering in 1960 resulted in a newly-formed Department of Experimental and Theoretical Mechanics (also possibly known as Mechanics and Materials Science, though unconfirmed) which was later shortened to the Department of Mechanics around this time. This program led the fields of continuum mechanics, theoretical and experimental fluid and solid mechanics, and thermodynamics. Eventually the program was renamed the Department of Mechanical Engineering in 1985.

Source: http://me.jhu.edu/about/department-history/ Source: Hopkins: Engineering at the University (1985) by Mary Ruth Yoe Source: http://engineering.jhu.edu/centennial

Found in 2 Collections and/or Records:

Department of Mechanical Engineering records

 Collection
Identifier: RG-06-020
Overview This collection consists of records of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, including materials from visiting committees, faculty meetings, films, departmental records, and undergraduate student records, circa 1960s-1990s.

Robert B. Pond, Sr. papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0640
Overview Robert B. Pond, Sr. (1917-2007) helped found Johns Hopkins University's Department of Material Science, where he served as chair for eight years. The collection includes papers relating to Professor Pond's involvement with companies such as Marvalaud Inc. and Inland Steel Company, and materials from his various roles at Johns Hopkins University, including advising, administrative, and teaching materials. His papers span from 1946 to approximately 1987.